DOGS

10 TIPS ABOUT CARING FOR YOUR DOG

1-TYPES OF FOOD

Dog owners have a wide choice when it comes to deciding what to feed their canine companions. The important thing to remember is that food marketed for adult dogs is suitable for dogs aged nine months and over. Although prepared foods are convenient, the best way to know what your dog is eating is to create its meals yourself. Always adhere to the recommended food allowances for your pet.

CANNED MOIST FOOD

Meaty canned dog food is a quick, easy choice, best served with dry supplements.

DRY FOOD

Crunchy dry foods come in two types: complete meal and snack foods.

SEMIMOIST FOOD

This type of food may contain high levels of sugar, so use it sparingly.

2-TABLE SCRAPS

It is important to discourage your dog from begging for whatever food you are eating. The best way to do this right from the beginning is never to feed it your leftovers directly from the table or wherever else you might be eating. If your uneaten food is suitable for your dog, put it into the dog’s food bowl, and position the bowl in its usual place in the house.

3-PROVIDING ENOUGH WATER

Fresh water ought to be out there for your dog in the slightest degree times. Dogs lose water through their usual bodily functions—in urine and feces, as well as through panting— and that needs to be replenished. If a dog is unable to drink for 48 hours, it could suffer irreversible dehydration and organ damage. Fill the water bowl to the same level each day, so you can monitor how much your dog is drinking.

KEEP IT CLEAN

Each time you refill your dog’s water bowl, throw away any that is left over and wash the bowl thoroughly before reusing it.

4-SUITABLE TREATS & CHEWS

There are many types of branded treats available for your dog, and they can be great as rewards in training exercises. Do be aware, though, that—just like treats for humans—they can be high in fats, carbohydrates, and calories. An alternative to such treats are chews, which give a dog’s teeth and gums a good workout, leave less mess around the house, and are far lower in calories. They can conjointly keep a dog quiet for hours between walks.

GO EASY ON THE TREATS

If you use a lot of treats while training your dog, you should moderate its meal size to compensate.

5-HOW MUCH FOOD & WHEN?

The amount of food that you should give your dog will depend largely on its size, but also on its age and the amount of exercise it gets. Adult dogs—that is, those over nine months of age—may be fed their entire daily intake in one meal or it can be split into two meals; puppies need at least three meals a day for their first six months, dropping down to two between the ages of six and nine months.

6-SETTING A ROUTINE

To prevent any weight issues with your dog, do not leave food down at all times, and don’t feed it whenever it comes looking around for something to eat. Choose feeding times that work for you in your work or home routine, and stick to them. Your dog will soon come to know exactly when its bowl will be filled.

DINNER O’CLOCK!

Set regular feeding times, and remove bowls when your dog has finished eating, especially if you are using moist or fresh foods.

7-FOODS TO AVOID

One good reason to make sure your dog does not steal food is that some foods that are suitable for humans can be hazardous for dogs. The consequences can range from mild stomach upsets to life threatening illness or death.

AVOID CHOCOLATE

Human chocolate is poisonous for dogs. Use doggie chocs instead.

8-DEALING WITH UNDERWEIGHT DOGS

A fit and healthy dog ought to be slim and muscular while not being skinny. In most breeds, you should not be able to see the outlines of bones through the skin. If you are concerned about your dog being underweight, your vet can advise you on the right feeding regimen.

PUPPY WEIGHT

Find out the optimum weight for your dog, based on breed and gender, and work toward it with your vet’s help.

9-DEALING WITH OVERWEIGHT DOGS

Excess weight can lead to medical issues and shorten your dog’s life. If your dog is overweight, speak to your vet. Your dog might have an underlying medical condition that causes weight gain or it might need more exercise.

FIGHTING THE FAT

Prevent obesity by feeding your dog according to daily requirements based on its breed and gender.

10-TRIMMING CLAWS

For most dogs, monthly claw-trimming ought to be adequate, however specific necessities can depend upon the kind of dog and its life-style. Cut the nails as close to the quick as possible, but take care not to cut the quick itself, since this will be painful for the dog. A cut quick will also bleed quite heavily and may, in worst-case scenarios, lead to infection.

CUTTING BLACK CLAWS

Black claws make it more difficult to see where the quick is. Remove small amounts at a time until you are happy with the length.

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